Recent Changes

Monday, January 6

  1. page F edited ... [See also comments at A Good Beer Blog at post "Book Review: The Oxford Companion To Beer…
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    [See also comments at A Good Beer Blog at post "Book Review: The Oxford Companion To Beer".]
    "Free Mash-Tun Act (1880)" at page 376 states: "Instead of a tax on malted barley (instigated in 1660) …" A tax on malt was first introduced in England and Wales in 1697, and in Scotland in 1713. What happened in 1660 was a confirmation by Charles II of taxes on beer and ale introduced during the Civil War/Commonwealth period.
    "Friability" When analysing malt friability is not just used as a measure of malt dryness, it is also an indicator of the degree of modification and the homogeneity.
    "Fuggle (hop)" at page 379 states that the hop was "found as a seedling in 1861 and introduced by Richard Fuggle some 14 years later". Recent investigation has failed to identify a Richard Fuggle who might have introduced the hop of the same name, and failed to confirm either the date of its discovery or the date of its introduction. [See Kim Cook, “Who produced Fuggle’s Hops”, Brewery History magazine, Spring 2009, issue 130.]
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    Burton Extra.
    The ABV for Chiswick Bitter is 3.5% not 3.8% as stated.
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    12:29 pm

Friday, January 3

  1. page A edited ... On page 57 it states: "A-B also owns 25% of Red Hook Ale Brewery, as well as 40% of Craft…
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    On page 57 it states: "A-B also owns 25% of Red Hook Ale Brewery, as well as 40% of Craft Brewers Alliance (formerly Widmer Brother Brewing), which owns 100% of Kona Brewing Company and 49% of Coastal Brewing." According to their 2010 Annual Report, the Craft Brewers Alliance is the result of the merger of the Redhook (not "Red Hook") and Widmer breweries, and now includes 100% ownership of Kona. A __Beverage Industry__ magazine article in Nov. 2008 put the percentage of A-B's ownership of the CBA company at 36%. CBA has no relationship or ownership of Coastal Brewing Co. which the sentence seems to imply. A-B does own 49% of Coastal Brewing Co. - a joint venture of Fordham Brewing Co. and A-B, which purchased Virginia's Old Dominion Brewing Co., in 2007.
    Also, the illustration of A-B malt houses on page 53, identified as an "Etching... circa 1850" is a well-known postcard that clearly dates from much later than mid-Nineteenth century based on the size of the buildings and other factors (streetcars, motor trucks). As the OCB entry even states, Anheuser would not take control of the Bavarian Brewing Company until "around 1859", and the company would not be -renamed "Anheuser-Busch" until 1879 according to Anheuser-Busch's "History" webpage.
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    Company here.
    Arthur Guinness & Sons entry (page 66 ) states that "By 1910 the ever-expanding plant was producing 2 million hogsheads (54 UK gal, 64.8 US casks) …" "US casks" is an error for "US gallons", but in any case these were Irish hogsheads, which had a capacity of 48 UK gallons, 57.6 US gallons. See eg here
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    5:35 pm

Wednesday, August 7

  1. page A edited ... In this entry lambic, white beer and weissbier should be cross referenced. "amylases&quo…
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    In this entry lambic, white beer and weissbier should be cross referenced.
    "amylases" this entry should be cross referenced to the aleurone layer.
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    and wort.
    "amylose"

    "amylose"
    this entry
    ...
    and starch.
    "Anheuser-Busch" entry states (page 55) "The spectacular implosion of the huge Schlitz brand in the late 1970's...allowed A-B to snap up a good portion of the Schlitz market share..." Which specific company benefits from another's loss of market share is at best an estimate, but as Schlitz's share went from 12.2% in 1970 to 9.8% in 1979 (a loss of only 2.5% of the total market), A-B's increased from 17.8% to 27% in the same period. Most industry analysts would probably suggest that the Miller Brewing Co., which would end the decade as the #2 US brewery bumping it's Milwaukee competitor down to #3, gained the largest portion of Schlitz's market, going from 4.1% to 21% in the '70's. (Market share number from R. S. Weinberg).
    On page 56 the OCB states "Michelob...was first brewed in 1901". A-B promotional material for over a century has claimed the year 1896 for Michelob's initial release (see current Michelob website "...since 1896"). and newspaper ads which mention the brand as part of A-B's portfolio exist from the late 1890's.
    On page 57 it states: "A-B also owns 25% of Red Hook Ale Brewery, as well as 40% of Craft Brewers Alliance (formerly Widmer Brother Brewing), which owns 100% of Kona Brewing Company and 49% of Coastal Brewing." According to their 2010 Annual Report, the Craft Brewers Alliance is the result of the merger of the Redhook (not "Red Hook") and Widmer breweries, and now includes 100% ownership of Kona. A __Beverage Industry__ magazine article in Nov. 2008 put the percentage of A-B's ownership of the CBA company at 36%. CBA has no relationship or ownership of Coastal Brewing Co. which the sentence seems to imply. A-B does own 49% of Coastal Brewing Co. - a joint venture of Fordham Brewing Co. and A-B, which purchased Virginia's Old Dominion Brewing Co., in 2007.
    Also, the illustration of A-B malt houses on page 53, identified as an "Etching... circa 1850" is a well-known postcard that clearly dates from much later than mid-Nineteenth century based on the size of the buildings and other factors (streetcars, motor trucks). As the OCB entry even states, Anheuser would not take control of the Bavarian Brewing Company until "around 1859", and the company would not be -renamed "Anheuser-Busch" until 1879 according to Anheuser-Busch's "History" webpage.
    apprenticeship in this entry it states that "Eventually, the [medieval] guilds gave rise to modern trade unions." They did not, they gave rise to livery companies. See for example the history of the Brewers' Company here.
    Arthur Guinness & Sons entry (page 66 ) states that "By 1910 the ever-expanding plant was producing 2 million hogsheads (54 UK gal, 64.8 US casks) …" "US casks" is an error for "US gallons", but in any case these were Irish hogsheads, which had a capacity of 48 UK gallons, 57.6 US gallons. See eg here
    (view changes)
    12:10 pm

Tuesday, August 6

  1. page H edited ... "associated with heather itself is a specific fungal growth (colloquially called 'fogg' o…
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    "associated with heather itself is a specific fungal growth (colloquially called 'fogg' or simply 'white powder' …"
    "Fogg" is the Scots dialect word for moss, and the "fogg" growing on the heather is moss. The white powder or fungus is associated with the moss.
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    as 117.34. The UK beer barrel is given as 163.66 litres but it's 163.58.
    "Heineken" in this entry the fact that Heineken have more than 125 breweries in 70 countries is mentioned twice in the same paragraph.
    "herbs." in this entry it states that "commercial brewers are only allowed to include herbs upon approval by governmental authorities." It does not however state in which county or countries these regulations apply.
    (view changes)
    2:05 pm

Sunday, May 5

  1. page H edited ... "herbs." in this entry it states that "commercial brewers are only allowed to i…
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    "herbs." in this entry it states that "commercial brewers are only allowed to include herbs upon approval by governmental authorities." It does not however state in which county or countries these regulations apply.
    "Hildegard of Bingen" entry at page 435 states:"Hildegard died in her beloved Rupertsberg in 1179 at aged 81 – an incredible example of longevity at a time when the live expectancy was merely 30 to 40 years." This is a misunderstanding of the statistics of life expectancy. High rates of infant mortality in the medieval period meant low life expectancy, of only 30 or 40 years, at birth. By the time someone had reached the age of 21, however, their life expectancy was up to 64. For a nun, living in a sheltered environment, 81 might have been unusual but was certainly not "incredible".
    Also her writings may well "still be considered valid by homeopaths" but I certainly hope that the are not, as stated, considered valid by physicians.
    "history of beer" entry at page 438 has an alleged quote from Pliny's Natural History: "So exquisite is the cunning of man in gratifying their vices and appetites that they have invented a method to make water itself produce intoxication." This is a common, but madly over-elaborate and very poor translation of two sentences from Book XIV, chapter 22: "heu mira vitiorum sollertia! inventum est quemadmodum aquae quoque inebriarent," which is more succinctly translated: "O, our marvellously ingenious vices! Even water has been made intoxicating."
    It also states at page 439:"Hops moved into England in the 1400s, and although many people clung to unhopped ale for more than a century, British beer was largely hopped by the mid-1500s." This is confusing ale with beer: of the two malt liquors, beer in Britain was always a hopped drink, ale was not. It would also be wrong to say that British malt liquors were largely hopped by the mid-1500s: the evidence is that ale remained generally unhopped well into the 17th century throughout Britain, and that it stayed largely or entirely unhopped in the North of England and Scotland until the start of the 18th century. Ale continued to be generally more lightly hopped than beer until the 19th century.
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    11:29 am

Sunday, March 10

  1. page Y edited "Yorkshire Square" The Black Sheep Brewery has now developed similar round shaped ferment…
    "Yorkshire Square" The Black Sheep Brewery has now developed similar round shaped fermenting vessels: "Yorkshire Rounds".
    "Young's Brewery" a tiny microbrewery has been in operation since Young's closed to maintain continuous brewing on the site, see for example here.
    (view changes)
    9:51 am
  2. 9:12 am
  3. page Y edited "Yorkshire Square" The Black Sheep Brewery has now developed similar round shaped fermen…
    "Yorkshire Square" The Black Sheep Brewery has now developed similar round shaped fermenting vessels: "Yorkshire Rounds".
    (view changes)
    9:12 am

Sunday, January 20

  1. page G edited ... The alpha acid range is given as 4% to 7%, but a recent newsletter from hop merchants Charles …
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    The alpha acid range is given as 4% to 7%, but a recent newsletter from hop merchants Charles Faram gives the range as 5% to 8% for East Kent Goldings and 4% to 8% for Goldings and it is possible for some of the Golding clones to occasionally go as high as 10%.
    "Goose Island Beer Company." This company is now owned by AB InBev.
    "Gose": The article is missing.
    "Gram stain" Though the method described in this entry is based on the staining method published by Hans Christian Gram in 1884, in Gram's original method there wasn't a counter-stain, this further development coming later from Carl Weigert.
    "Great British Beer Festival" The GBBF has now returned to Olympia.
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    1:25 am

Friday, January 18

  1. page P edited ... This entry also states at page 653: "It’s more likely that Martin Stelzer brought back fr…
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    This entry also states at page 653: "It’s more likely that Martin Stelzer brought back from England a malt kiln indirectly fired by coke rather than directly fired by wood. This type of kiln was used to make pale malt, the basis of a new style of beer brewed in England called pale ale. A model of a kiln in the Pilsen museum supports this theory..." This is simply wild speculation. As noted above, the brewery’s own chronicle has no record of Martin Stelzer — one of the most prolific architects of his age, the author of hundreds of buildings in Pilsen — taking time off to travel all the way to Britain. Given his task — to construct a Bavarian-style, bottom-fermenting brewery — there would have been no reason to do so. However, it is apparent that the Burghers’ Brewery was originally outfitted with a noteworthy kiln, whose description in Czech (“dle anglického spůsobu zařízený hvozd”) seems to make it clear that this was not, in fact, a kiln which had come from England, but rather “a kiln equipped in the English manner,” according to Kniha pamětní král. krajského města Plzně od roku 775 až 1870, an extensive chronicle of Pilsen published in 1883. (According to this book, this kiln was “vytápěný odcházejícím teplem z místnosti ku vaření,” or “heated by heat leaving the boiling room.”) See here .
    This entry also uses the misspelling "Plzensky Prazdroj" at page 654. A small mistake to outsiders, but technically a misspelling in local terms, as N and Ň (and Y and Ý) are considered different letters in Czech. This misspelling is also found on page 277. Strangely, The Oxford Companion to Beer itself spells the name correctly as “Plzeňský Prazdroj” on pages 74, 103, 140, 386, 651 and 652. See here .
    Also in this entry "nitrates" should be "nitrogen", a common way protein levels in barley are expressed.
    "pine, fir and spruce tips" entry at p655 is almost entirely US-centric: it ignores, eg, references to "Spruce-beer" being on sale in London in 1664 (see here) and the mention of spruce beer in Jane Austen's Emma, as well as the spruce beer made today by Williams Brothers of Alloa, Alba.
    "Plato gravity scale" though throught the OCBeer commas replace decimal points when specific gravity is written in this entry both are used.
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    12:43 pm

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